Member Spotlight: Wana Brands

Member Spotlight: Wana Brands

Why did you join CBA?

The marijuana infused products industry has experienced tremendous growth over the past five years, and along the way we have been faced with some legislation that created a variety of challenges for business owners. I joined this collaborative group to be part of the process of shaping this new industry in a way that protects public safety while not placing undue burden on businesses.  Being a CBA member gives you a seat at the table.

What are the tangible benefits of the membership?

CBA offers its members  a number of benefits including industry meetings, lobbying communications services, voter’s guides, and event listings.  However, one of the most valuable benefits of being a member, in my opinion, is the opportunity to get to know like-minded people in the industry, and unite in a very important purpose - to advocate with our government for sensible and collaborative public policy, which protects employees, patients, and clients of the medical and retail marijuana industry.  I’ve made friends and met new business associates through my CBA membership that has enhanced my personal and professional life.

Examples on how the membership has saved you money, prevented you from making a mistake, provided you with a network etc.

There have been numerous times when I would have either missed or misinterpreted a regulation that would have either put us out of compliance or would have cost us a huge amount of money.  Also the ability to reach out to other members to get their input on various issues has been invaluable.

Why is it important to be involved in the industry?

I view involvement with CBA as not only part of my duty and responsibility to the community around me, but also in part as an  opportunity to “pay it forward” and contribute to the industry which has embraced and welcomed me for the past six years as an entrepreneur. I joined CBA to help promote values that enhance the cannabis industry’s role in the state’s business economy, build respect for the industry in our community, and support client and patient access, education and safety.   

Anything else you would like to add?

Our lobbyist has been incredibly effective in representing our concerns and preferences and has been instrumental in shaping legislation in many ways that have benefited the industry. Because of her success, all cannabis business owners, whether they know it or not, are all benefiting from the investment that CBA’s members are making through their association dues.  I really encourage other businesses to do their share in supporting a safe and appropriately regulated industry through a CBA membership.

The Cannabis Industry Is On High Alert After Sean Spicer Suggests Feds Will Crack Down on Marijuana

DCMJ's Inaugural #Trump420 Marijuana Rally on January 20, 2017 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Theo Wargo/Getty Images)

DCMJ's Inaugural #Trump420 Marijuana Rally on January 20, 2017 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Theo Wargo/Getty Images)

FORBES

By: Debra Borchardt

White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer threw the cannabis industry into tumult on Thursday, saying that the White House expects federal law enforcement agents to enforce federal law in states where recreational marijuana use has been legalized. 

The Cannabis Business Alliance stated, “Dialing back any level of legalization of marijuana would be extremely misguided and would turn back the enormous positive progress that has occurred over the last several years.” The alliance said that the industry is compliant, a job creator and tax engine that brings state budgets out of the red and into the black. 

Read the full article here.

Cannabis Business Alliance Statement: Federal comments on adult use cannabis

Cannabis Business Alliance Statement: Federal comments on adult use cannabis

 

DENVER (Feb. 23, 2017)The Cannabis Business Alliance (CBA) has released a statement regarding recent comments from the White House on adult-use marijuana.

Mark Malone, Executive Director, Cannabis Business Alliance stated: “The legal cannabis industry takes power and money out of the hands of drug cartels and puts funds into state coffers and has the real potential to help offset the Federal Government’s budget shortfalls. The legal cannabis industry provides safety procedures and regulations that protect our youth, and states where cannabis is legal have seen a reduction of teen use. In fact, a recent study found that opioid use decreases in states that legalize marijuana. Dialing back any level of legalization of marijuana would be extremely misguided and would turn back the enormous positive progress that has occurred over the last several years. Going after the legal marijuana industry would be a direct affront to the overwhelming numbers of Americans who have voted time after time to approve legal cannabis. It would also be an affront to the Cole Memo and a misuse of energy and taxpayer funds. The Cannabis industry is compliant, a job creator, and tax engine bringing state budgets out of the red and into the black.  Republicans have core values that include belief in state rights and a free market. The same voters that have elected the current Administration continue to overwhelmingly support cannabis, as was evident in this fall’s Elections. President Trump has said that this is a State issue so we expect him to be true to his word and continue to let States regulate cannabis.”

Colorado, the first U.S. state to legalize cannabis for adult-use, reported selling $1.3 billion in marijuana and marijuana-related products in 2016, with a projected $3 billion economic impact for 2016. Additionally, Colorado’s 2016 tax revenues from marijuana sales were about $199 million in tax and fees revenue for the calendar year. These taxes fund projects including school construction, public health and law enforcement. Throughout the country, cannabis prohibition continued to be rolled back, with more states legalizing marijuana in 2016. Earlier in 2016, Ohio and Pennsylvania legalized medical marijuana, and Illinois decriminalized the plant. November’s election results found four states voting positively to approve cannabis for adult-use (California, Maine, Massachusetts and Nevada), and four states voting to allow Medical Marijuana use (Florida, Arkansas, North Dakota and Montana). These new additions mean 29 states plus the District of Columbia now offer some category of legal cannabis, and one in five Americans soon will have access to legal marijuana.

Cannabis continues to offer a positive medicinal option for patients including veterans suffering from PTSD and children with debilitating conditions such as epilepsy and spastic quadriplegic cerebral palsy. A recent report from the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment found that marijuana consumption by Colorado high school students has dipped since the state first permitted recreational Cannabis use by adults. The biannual poll also showed the percentage of high school students consuming Cannabis is smaller than the national average among teens. Colorado has experienced a significant economic boost since the legalization of Cannabis, accounting for sizeable job growth and tax income for Colorado.

 

About the Cannabis Business Alliance (CBA)

The Cannabis Business Alliance (CBA) is an advocate and a resource for business owners, employees, patients and clients of the medical and adult-use marijuana industry. CBA promotes programs that will enhance the emerging marijuana industry’s place in Colorado’s business economy, create respect for the industry in the communities we serve, and support client and patient access, education and safety. For more information, visit www.cannabisalliance.org. Friend us on Facebook. Follow us on Twitter.

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Colorado Governor Talks Cannabis Challenges in California Capitol

Colorado Governor Talks Cannabis Challenges in California Capitol

The Associated Press

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper told California state senators Tuesday to set standards for edible marijuana goods and driving under the influence of cannabis as soon as possible to avoid repeating mistakes his state made when it legalized recreational cannabis.

Mark Malone, executive director of the Denver-based Cannabis Business Alliance, cheered the interstate cooperation but also questioned the evidence of some of Hickenlooper’s claims.

“We encourage newly legalized states to visit Colorado and speak to representatives and those with established cannabis businesses so that they can form better and more efficient rules and regulations around a very successful industry; there is no reason to recreate the wheel,” Malone said in a statement Wednesday.

To read the full article click here 

CBA Statement: States on Path to Cannabis Legalization can find insight from Colorado’s Industry for  Best Practices in Regulation and Child Safety

CBA Statement: States on Path to Cannabis Legalization can find insight from Colorado’s Industry for Best Practices in Regulation and Child Safety



 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Shawna McGregor

Shawna@rosengrouppr.com, 917-971-7852
 

Cannabis Business Alliance Statement:

States on Path to Cannabis Legalization can find insight from Colorado’s Industry for Best Practices in Regulation and Child Safety

DENVER (February 15, 2017) — In response to Gov. Hickenlooper’s recent visit to speak with California legislators in Sacramento, Calif., in advance of legalization of adult-use cannabis, The Cannabis Business Alliance (CBA)  has released a statement. The advocate for cannabis business owners is calling on states like California and other emerging markets to reach out to those who have been involved in Colorado's cannabis industry for insight on what works best when it comes to regulation and child safety.

“It is great to see legislators from different states coming together to discuss the challenges and benefits of the cannabis industry,” said Mark Malone, Executive Director of the Cannabis Business Alliance. “We encourage newly legalized states to visit Colorado and speak to representatives and those with established cannabis businesses so that they can form better and more efficient rules and regulations around a very successful industry; there is no reason to recreate the wheel,” Malone said.  

Malone continued: “The CBA does take exception to the statement that ‘Colorado saw a rise in child hospitalization because of kids ingesting edible marijuana products in non-child proof containers.’ This is false. The industry did not receive any data that there were any issues with accidental ingestion prior to Colorado changing its edible rules and regulations. It is something the industry requested multiple times but to no avail. Now, the edible market is completely overburdened with the rules and regulations it has to abide to, like marking the actual edible with a ‘THC’ symbol -- a symbol that a child would not understand.”

In October 2016 a new law went into effect requiring all marijuana edible and cannabis infused product manufacturers in Colorado to feature  a “universal stamp” – a diamond enclosing the notations “!THC” or “!THCM” on all products and packaging, in an effort to raise public safety awareness.  With newly enforced stamping and regulation of shapes, the industry can safely claim that between child-resistance, prohibited advertising of cartoon characters, opaque packaging, and warning statements, that Colorado infused products manufacturers are doing more than any other industry to make edibles less appealing to kids while maintaining colors and flavors that do appeal to the adult markets we serve.

“We highly encourage states like California, and other emerging markets to speak directly with  people involved in Colorado’s cannabis industry regarding what works for child safety and industry efficiency,” Malone added.

For more information or to schedule an interview, please contact Shawna McGregor at 917-971-7852 or shawna@rosengrouppr.com.

About the Cannabis Business Alliance (CBA)

The Cannabis Business Alliance (CBA) is an advocate and a resource for business owners, employees, patients and clients of the medical and adult-use marijuana industry. CBA promotes programs that will enhance the emerging marijuana industry’s place in Colorado’s business economy, create respect for the industry in the communities we serve, and support client and patient access, education and safety. For more information, visit www.cannabisalliance.org. Friend us on Facebook. Follow us on Twitter.

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Member Spotlight: Dabble Extracts

Member Spotlight: Dabble Extracts

pic.jpg

Why did you join CBA?

Due to how busy we all are on a daily basis in this fledgling industry, communication of urgent industry applicable issues seems to be a common struggle. Joining CBA was an easy way to quell that issue and to better build relationships with other industry professionals. CBA allows us to stay abreast of regulatory and legislative changes in the marijuana realm. CBA facilitates our ability to communicate with regulators as well as other industry leaders. As one of the many pioneers in this industry it is important to communally be able to take part in industry change and development.

What are the tangible benefits of the membership?

Most of the benefits that we enjoy from the CBA are intangible. There are numerous benefits that can be applied to many aspects of business. 

  • Open lines of communication with industry leaders and professionals.
  • The ability to influence policies and legislation being written regarding Marijuana.
  • An overall camaraderie.  Knowing that we are all in the same fight and want similar things to change or not to change within the industry. Being able to provide each other with different knowledge and/or services that could prove fruitful for all of our businesses.
  • Joining the CBA has been a key component to being an integral part of the MJ Community.

Examples on how the membership has saved you money, prevented you from making a mistake, provided you with a network etc.

Being ahead of potential regulatory and legislative changes allows us to properly plan for contingencies and has saved us money by allowing us to forecast various possible changes and their likely outcomes. The knowledge prevents us from making mistakes that would incur costly infractions. Whether it is labeling, transporting, or producing material in our industry we are extremely scrutinized and it is easy for even the most professional company to make a mistake. Being prevalent in Colorado's marijuana industry it is critical to communicate with each other. Even though we may see each other as competition it is key that we work together and voice our opinions on issues to ensure a positive progression of changes in our industry as it will affect us all.

Why is it important to be involved in the industry?

We are all individual entities when it comes to our businesses. Being a part of the CBA allows us to join a huddle and come up with a solid game plan moving forward with new regulatory changes.  Colorado is the poster child for marijuana regulation nationally.  We as an industry need to make sure we set the bar high for other prospective states that look to follow in our image in order to protect the future of our industry. The best way to ensure favorable change happens within our industry, is for all of us to actually be a part of it.

 

Cannabis Business Alliance Statement: Richard Kirk Case

Cannabis Business Alliance Statement: Richard Kirk Case

Cannabis Business Alliance Statement:

Richard Kirk Case

DENVER (February 3, 2017)The Cannabis Business Alliance (CBA) has released a statement regarding the case against Richard Kirk, who has pled guilty to second-degree murder after confessing to the murder of his wife Kristine Kirk. Much of the news coverage attempted to connect the tragedy to the consumption of a cannabis infused edible.  

“The Cannabis Business Alliance (CBA) acknowledges this was a horrific violent crime and our deepest sympathies continue to be with the family and friends that were affected by the tragic death of Kristine Kirk. The industry is relieved that after years of investigation and mental evaluations that Richard Kirk accepted responsibility for his actions. CBA encourages public safety and consumer responsibility and is an advocate for proper dosing and consumer education, such as the Start Low, Go Slow campaign,” noted Cannabis Business Alliance Executive Director Mark Malone.

The edible reportedly consumed by Richard Kirk prior to committing this horrific crime was properly labeled in accordance with state law and rules in place at the time. As a fledgling industry, it’s not unexpected to be under increased scrutiny. However, the fact remains that violent crimes decreased in Denver from 2013 to 2014, and legalizing medical marijuana causes no increase in crime, according to a recent study. In fact, legalized medical pot may reduce some violent crime, including homicide.

Cannabis continues to offer a positive medicinal option for patients including veterans suffering from PTSD and children with debilitating conditions such as epilepsy and spastic quadriplegic cerebral palsy. A recent report from the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment found that marijuana consumption by Colorado high school students has dipped since the state first permitted recreational Cannabis use by adults. The biannual poll also showed the percentage of high school students consuming Cannabis is smaller than the national average among teens. Colorado has experienced a significant economic boost since the legalization of Cannabis, accounting for sizeable job growth and tax income for Colorado.

 

About the Cannabis Business Alliance (CBA)

The Cannabis Business Alliance (CBA) is an advocate and a resource for business owners, employees, patients and clients of the medical and adult-use marijuana industry. CBA promotes programs that will enhance the emerging marijuana industry’s place in Colorado’s business economy, create respect for the industry in the communities we serve, and support client and patient access, education and safety. For more information, visit www.cannabisalliance.org. Friend us on Facebook. Follow us on Twitter.

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Member Spotlight: Mountain Medicine

Member Spotlight: Mountain Medicine

 

Why did you join CBA?

I started the Cannabis Business Alliance because there was a need for a unified voice in the cannabis industry. Before the CBA, there were not a lot of trade association options, so I wanted to start an association that was reasonably priced and provided an accessible forum to connect with policy-makers, city officials, law enforcement, and other regulators. It’s one of the best things I have ever done; I have learned so much in the process.

 What are the tangible benefits of the membership?

There are endless benefits of being a CBA member. The ability to connect with other members, owners, and operators is extremely beneficial. You’re also able to balance ideas off of people and streamline production based on what others are doing. There’s a direct line of communication with the marijuana enforcement division, and you’re able to have weekly and monthly meetings with them to discuss the regulatory process. In the cannabis industry, all of us have our heads down and don’t often have the time to connect with others in the industry, so the regular meetings are a great and time-efficient way to connect. 

Examples on how the membership has saved you money, prevented you from making a mistake, provided you with a network etc.

Being a member of the CBA gives us the ability to know what is going to happen in the industry before it actually does - we are made aware when the marijuana enforcement division is going to start drafting certain rules. Around the time we passed recreational, I knew that rec testing was going to be pushed sooner than we thought, so my team was able to start the research and development process early. The CBA gives us real-time access to department and regulatory bodies so we can make better decisions and be made aware of what’s to come. Regarding financial benefits: the amount of money you spend to join a trade association could potentially save you thousands of dollars in legal advice from attorneys who get their information from that same association (especially for small businesses who may not be able to afford those attorneys).

Why is it important to be involved in the industry?

Since the cannabis industry is new and emerging, Colorado is being utilized as an example of both good and bad regulations. It’s important for members of the industry to have an active voice regarding how everything shapes out. If you’re not in the industry, your voice isn’t being heard. 

Cannabis Industry Outlook 2017

Cannabis Industry Outlook 2017

 

Cannabis Industry Outlook 2017

New states, more regulation, education, potency

 

DENVER (December 19, 2016) — As the year comes to a close, the Cannabis Business Alliance (CBA)  reviews the highlights of 2016 and provides an outlook for 2017.

Enormous growth: Colorado, the first U.S. state to legalize cannabis for adult-use, has already reported selling more than $1 billion in marijuana and marijuana-related products in the first 10 months of 2016, with the state on track to see a $3 billion economic impact for 2016. Additionally, Colorado’s 2016 tax revenues are projected to total more than 2014 and 2015 combined. Throughout the country, cannabis prohibition continued to be rolled back, with more states legalizing marijuana in 2016. Earlier in 2016, Ohio and Pennsylvania legalized medical marijuana, and Illinois decriminalized the plant. November’s election results found four states voting positively to approve cannabis for adult-use (California, Maine, Massachusetts and Nevada), and four states voting to allow Medical Marijuana use (Florida, Arkansas, North Dakota and Montana). These new additions mean 29 states plus the District of Columbia now offer some category of legal cannabis, and one in five Americans soon will have access to legal marijuana.

Edibles Safety & Regulation: The Colorado edibles industry continued to actively address concerns regarding consumer safety. In June, a bill was signed that mandates that the products cannot be shaped like animals, or be in packaging designed to appeal to children. The industry in Colorado ramped up for stamping regulations that went into full effect Dec. 1, requiring all packaging as well as cannabis-infused products to be marked with the specific symbol of THC and ! within a diamond shape. Recent regulations also prohibit edibles manufacturers from buying commercial non-infused products and spraying them with hash oil, as the average consumer or child would not be able to tell the difference between a medicated and unmedicated product.

With these regulations in place, the cannabis industry can safely claim that between stamping, regulation of shapes, child-resistance, prohibited advertising of cartoon characters, opaque packaging, and warning statements, that Colorado infused products manufacturers are doing more than any other industry to make edibles less appealing to kids while maintaining colors and flavors that do appeal to the adult markets it serves. Legal cannabis products are less likely to be accidentally ingested by kids than dish detergent packets, diaper rash cream, and even alcohol-infused chocolates. With more than five million infused product units sold each year and diminishing cases of accidental ingestion, the industry feels strongly that it is headed in the right direction.

CBA maintains that banning legal edibles or regulating edibles out of existence merely pushes a safe, regulated, taxable industry with professionally produced, lab-tested products packaged in childproof packaging into the Black Market where homemade edibles with no testing or limits on potency and no required packaging become a much more dangerous situation for children. CBA stresses that adults must keep cannabis products safely out of the reach of children, and educate youth on the dangers of underage consumption.

Legislative Successes: The 2016 legislative session in Colorado was eventful for the cannabis industry, and CBA looks forward to seeing how these new regulations will shape the landscape of the legal cannabis industry in Colorado for the better. The retail marijuana Sunset Bill included a section that eliminated the differential between resident and non-resident purchasing limits. Inconsistent purchasing regulations didn’t make sense for the industry because having two different purchasing limits turned every transaction into an algebra equation.

Cannabis Business Alliance worked with the legislature to approve an amendment to keep the most basic labeling requirements in the statute intact, but to entrust the rulemaking process to support a collaborative effort to re-examine, and determine simplified and effective labeling standards. Existing labels contain an enormous amount of information, some of which is redundant, that can confuse consumers and achieve the opposite effect from the intention of the law. CBA looks forward to working with regulators and safety experts to determine the right amount of information and messaging needed for cannabis products to achieve a more effective paradigm for cannabis package labeling.

2017 OUTLOOK

A New Administration. CBA looks forward to working with the new administration to educate incoming lawmakers on how the cannabis industry is compliant, a job creator, and tax engine bringing state budgets out of the red and into the black. Republicans have core values that include belief in state rights and a free market. The same voters that have elected these officials continue to overwhelmingly support cannabis, as was evident in this fall’s Elections.

Potency Education. Misinformation around potency continues to present challenges for the industry. The CBA is committed to educating consumers on what potency means and why it is important to have a wide array of potency in cannabis products. In 2013, Colorado residents voted for Amendment 64, which requires the state to regulate marijuana like alcohol. Attempts to introduce potency limits by prohibitionists are equivalent to limiting all liquor in Colorado to 3.2 percent beer. Limiting potency would cripple the legal cannabis industry and force the industry back into the Black Market. The CBA has developed a debunking the myths fact sheet for potency at this link.

Harmonizing Medical and Recreational rules. CBA looks forward to working with Colorado lawmakers to reconcile the 70/30 rule, which would allow medical dispensaries to source more than 30 percent of their onsite inventory from wholesalers. CBA is also hoping to work with legislators to reconcile other medical rules with retail rules, including harmonize labeling between medical and adult-use products, and discrepancies in transfer policies, such as allowing manufacturer-to-manufacturer transfers for medical in the same manner already allowed by adult use.

Options for Testing Discrepancies. CBA hopes to work with lawmakers to create another option for products that fail pesticide testing. A new rule allows harvest batches to be turned into solvent-based concentrates if it fails microbials. This saves the industry millions of dollars of product that would have been destroyed when  otherwise considered safe.

“As a fledgling industry, cannabis may face more regulations than pharmaceuticals, liquor and tobacco combined, with a patchwork of laws varying from state to state. Rules are changing too fast and too often. Now that Colorado’s adult-use market has a couple of years under its belt, the industry would like to see stability in rules so that law enforcement can regulate industry in a more efficient way,” said CBA Executive Director Mark Malone. “The industry also wants to see more in-depth research that properly codes cannabis sources, so we can decipher between the regulated market and the black market.”

CBA representatives are available for comment on these and other cannabis policy issues. For more information or to schedule an interview, contact Shawna McGregor, 917-971-7852 or shawna@rosengrouppr.com.

About the Cannabis Business Alliance (CBA)

The Cannabis Business Alliance (CBA) is an advocate and a resource for business owners, employees, patients and clients of the medical and adult-use marijuana industry. CBA promotes programs that will enhance the emerging marijuana industry’s place in Colorado’s business economy, create respect for the industry in the communities we serve, and support client and patient access, education and safety. For more information, visit www.cannabisalliance.org. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn.

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Cannabis Potency: Why Lawmakers Have A Problem With It

Cannabis Potency: Why Lawmakers Have A Problem With It

Photo Credit: http://www.marijuanagrowershq.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/calculate-potency.png

Photo Credit: http://www.marijuanagrowershq.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/calculate-potency.png

By: Stephen Calabria

HERB

In this article, HERB covers the important topic of potency, and CBA Executive Director Mark Malone comments on the opponents of higher potency cannabis :

Cannabis Business Alliance’s Mark Malone told HERB, opponents of higher potency are really looking to erect roadblocks for an industry to which they have never been partial.

"The logical conclusion is that the motive is to shut down the industry. There isn’t any other reason. If they’re really concerned about public health, they would try to pass amendments to combat alcoholism, methamphetamine, and opioid abuse… So, there’s no real reason behind it, besides, ‘How can we cripple the business?’"

Read the full article here

 

 

 

Cannabis Election Reflection: a View from Colorado

Cannabis Election Reflection: a View from Colorado

Image - Carol M. Highsmith

Image - Carol M. Highsmith

MARIJUANA PUBLIC MEDIA

By: Brian Bahouth 

During the election season, Colorado’s cannabis industry was under intense and highly manipulated scrutiny as an example of how legal cannabis works, or doesn’t work in America, and the industry and the state acquitted themselves so well, Maine, Massachusetts, Nevada and California will expand the number of legal adult-use states to 9, and now, Colorado’s exemplary cannabis industry is well positioned to help inform, hasten, and profit from the establishment of vast new markets.

To read the full article and listen to Mark Malone's interview with Marijuana Public Media, click here

Cannabis Business Alliance statement: Results of Election Day 2016

Cannabis Business Alliance statement: Results of Election Day 2016

DENVER (November 8, 2016)Cannabis Business Alliance (CBA)  Executive Director Mark Malone has released a statement on  Election Day 2016 results:

PUEBLO

Pueblo County voted on Ballot Question 200, a measure that would have repealed legal marijuana ordinances for the sale, cultivation and processing of recreational Cannabis. If the measure passed, recreational marijuana facilities and retailers in the county would have been required to close within a year.

The industry is thankful that common sense has prevailed. The legal Cannabis industry has meant economic successes for Pueblo by way of jobs. Banning legal Cannabis sales in Pueblo would have pushed the jobs and taxes it has brought into another community or worse: the black market,” Malone said. “In 2012, Pueblo County passed Amendment 64 with 62 percent support, a significant majority.  Pueblo has seen a significant economic boost since the legalization of Cannabis, accounting for 60 percent of new construction permits and $3 million a year in taxes. Pueblo has become an agricultural powerhouse in Colorado, supplying 30 to 40 percent of the state’s Cannabis product utilizing up to 6 million sq. ft. of cultivation. Banning legal Cannabis would not have kept Pueblo residents from consuming, they would have purchased Cannabis illegally from the black market, or in counties where it is legally sold. Proponents of Pueblo Ballot Measure 200 were extremely misguided.”

Pueblo is safer with legal Cannabis, which can be regulated. Repealing the legal status of Cannabis would have meant pushing the Cannabis industry back into the black market, moving power back into the hands of organized crime and gangs. There have been some biased statistics shared that seem to imply that Pueblo hospitals are seeing an influx of babies born with Cannabis in their system, but the study is skewed. Because drug tests are performed only when a new mother is suspected of or admits to drug use, the percentage of positive marijuana tests has been high in Pueblo, but the absolute numbers have been low.

For more information, visit CBA’s Debunking the Myths on Pueblo at CannabisAlliance.org.

DENVER BALLOT INITIATIVE 300

Denver’s Neighborhood-Supported Cannabis Consumption Pilot Program, is designed to provide adults safe, supervised spaces for Cannabis consumption in traditional social environments.

Malone said: “The Cannabis Business Alliance is pleased that Denver residents have approved Denver Ballot measure 300, once again positioning Denver as a leader in Cannabis Legalization. When Colorado residents overwhelmingly approved Amendment 64, they voted to have Cannabis regulated like alcohol. Now that recreational Cannabis has been legal for two years, Denver Ballot Initiative 300 appropriately addresses the enormous need to provide safe spaces for consumers--both residents and tourists--to enjoy Cannabis outside of the home. This initiative not only creates safe and regulated spaces for consumption, it also requires establishments who want to provide public settings for Cannabis consumers to engage their community before acquiring a permit. The importance of community approval is imperative if we are going to work together to better our communities in a world of legal Cannabis. By creating safe spaces for consumption, we are effectively taking open Cannabis consumption off the streets and into social, yet private settings.”

At present, the consumption of Cannabis in public is illegal, therefore the only legally recognized place for consumption is within a private residence with owner approval. This has driven tourists, renters and others to consume in public, which could account for the uptick in tickets issued for public consumption and more exposure to non-cannabis users or minors. The Denver Cannabis Consumption Pilot Program brings businesses and members of the community together to form a solution for public consumption by creating safe and regulated consumption spaces in accordance with the Colorado Clean Indoor Air Act.

 

NEW STATES COME ONLINE

On Election Day, five states voted on legalizing adult-use (or recreational) Cannabis (Arizona, California, Massachusetts, Maine, Nevada), and three states put legalizing the plant for medical purposes on the ballot (Florida, Montana, North Dakota).

Malone remarked: “The overwhelming support of voters in California, Massachusetts, Nevada and Maine reinforces the will of the people to overturn Prohibition. Sensibly regulating Cannabis takes it out of the Black Market and turns it into an economic driver. We are pleased to see these states following Colorado’s lead, and we look forward to seeing the Cannabis industry prosper and continue to be a job creator.”

CBA representatives are available for comment on these and other Cannabis policy issues. For more information or to schedule an interview, contact Shawna McGregor, 917-971-7852 or shawna@rosengrouppr.com.

 

About the Cannabis Business Alliance (CBA)

The Cannabis Business Alliance (CBA) is an advocate and a resource for business owners, employees, patients and clients of the medical and adult-use marijuana industry. CBA promotes programs that will enhance the emerging marijuana industry’s place in Colorado’s business economy, create respect for the industry in the communities we serve, and support client and patient access, education and safety. For more information, visit www.cannabisalliance.org. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn.

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DEBUNKING THE MYTHS AROUND CANNABIS POTENCY

DEBUNKING THE MYTHS AROUND CANNABIS POTENCY

DEBUNKING THE MYTHS AROUND CANNABIS POTENCY

On Nov. 8, five states will vote on legalizing recreational Cannabis, and three states will consider legalizing the plant for medical purposes. In the homestretch to Election Day, opponents of legal marijuana are resurrecting “Reefer Madness” with claims about the dangers of potency. In fact, legal Cannabis is an effective medicine that works when other options have failed. The legal marijuana industry provides product that is sensibly regulated and carefully tested. Lower concentrations of THC would mean that more of other things would dilute the product, forcing patients to consume--and pay--more. The Cannabis Business Alliance strongly supports the need to conduct more research and data to ensure current regulations are effective before trying to tweak them.

The Cannabis Business Alliance has developed a Debunking the Myths Fact Sheet, including sources, to address myths that have been circulating about cannabis potency. CBA representatives are available for comment on this important issue. For more information or to schedule an interview, contact shawna@rosengrouppr.com.

 

MYTH: A 16% potency limit on Cannabis products is an appropriate measure to make Cannabis a safer product.

FACT: Limiting THC content in legal Cannabis products would cripple Colorado’s fledgling Cannabis industry and would push supply to the Black Market causing a loss in jobs and tax revenue. In 2012, Colorado residents showed their support of the legal Cannabis market by overwhelmingly approving Amendment 64, which requires the state to regulate the Cannabis Industry like alcohol. Restrictions on Cannabis purity would be similar to limiting the alcohol content by volume on beer, wine and liquor. It would be the equivalent of only having 3.2 beer available.

Limiting potency would dramatically reduce access to life altering medicine for patients including veterans suffering from PTSD and children with debilitating conditions such as epilepsy and spastic quadriplegic cerebral palsy. Bearing in mind roughly 80 percent of the state’s lawfully retailed cannabis products would be deemed illegal, potency limitations would force most cannabis companies to shut down overnight.

MYTH: High potency Cannabis products are harmful to the body and brain.

FACT:  There is a lack of scientific evidence that cannabis products containing more than 16% THC are harmful for the brain and body[1].  Opponents of legal Cannabis aim to spread the message that higher THC levels somehow makes marijuana more dangerous for consumers. Contrary to popular myth, greater potency Cannabis is not necessarily more dangerous, especially due to the fact that users tend to adjust their dosing according to potency. When Cannabis contains higher levels of THC, consumers are not exposing themselves to increased risk, rather they are opening up the opportunity to address chronic symptoms or achieve an elevated lift in their experience. Higher potency Cannabis is actually healthier for users choosing to smoke the plant, as it reduces the amount of smoke needed to inhale to address a chronic health issue or achieve an elevated state of mind.

MYTH: High THC potency is dangerous for young brains and bodies.

FACT: High THC potency is not unsafe for children. In fact, products containing more than 16 percent THC may be necessary for many children with chronic conditions. THC potency should be something left to the discretion of medical professionals and their patients.[2]

MYTH: Consumers can overdose from high potency marijuana products.

FACT: It is not possible to die from consuming THC at any potency. Limiting THC potency does not make THC any safer, it only means consumers have to buy more product to achieve the same dosage to which they are accustomed.[3]

MYTH: Marijuana is significantly more potent today than it was 40 years ago.

FACT: The notion that cannabis has increased dramatically in potency has been the subject of much debate in recent years. The federal government has been testing marijuana potency for more than 40 years, and has long acknowledged the limitations to its methodologies. However, Federal research shows that the average potency of Cannabis in the United States has increased very little over time. According to the Federal Potency Monitoring Project, between 1985 and 2013 average potency increased by a meager 3%.[4] While there's almost certainly more potent cannabis strains available today, due to the fact that it is now legal to buy in multiple states, it does not mean that all marijuana is ultra-potent - which is how the narrative about potency is often framed and misconstrued. 

MYTH: The more potent the marijuana, the more brain cells are being killed.

FACT: There is little evidence to suggest that any of the active ingredients in Cannabis administered at doses appropriate for consumption have neurotoxic effects.This is in direct contrast to alcohol, where the body’s digestive process creates metabolites which are toxic to the brain and other cells in the body. A Journal of Neuroscience study conducted in January 2015 found that “no statistically significant differences were found between daily [marijuana] users and nonusers on volume or shape in the regions of interest…. In sum, the results indicate that, when carefully controlling for alcohol use, gender, age, and other variables, there is no association between marijuana use and standard volumetric or shape measurements of subcortical structures.[5]” Not only does this study prove that marijuana does not kill brain cells, but further more there were no significant differences between the brain activity of users and nonusers of marijuana. In fact, the evidence at this point indicates that marijuana does more good than harm when it comesto its effects on the adult brain. Specifically in the case of seizures, there is preliminary research which shows that the cannabinoid, cannabidiol or CBD, raises the threshold for seizure activity within the brain making it overall more difficult to have seizures, and thus providing hope to many parents of children with intractable seizure disorders.

MYTH: The only way to deal with potency concerns is to limit potency in cannabis products.

FACT:   Cannabis affects each user differently - some users may be more tolerant than others. Consumers with a high tolerance, may prefer a more potent strain, whereas novice consumers may choose something less potent. Federal regulations do not limit the potency of alcohol - so why should we limit the options for cannabis? Alcohol consumers have a plethora of options to choose from ranging from a 4 percent alcohol wine cooler to Everclear, which is 90 percent alcohol. Just as consumers of alcohol are permitted to choose their desired level of potency - so too should consumers of cannabis

MYTH: Marijuana users have no idea what they are consuming and are therefor are not in control of their experience.

FACT: While this may be somewhat accurate for consumers of black market product, it's quite the opposite for consumers who live in states where cannabis is legal. Consumers of legal cannabis have more control over their experience because they are able to make informed decisions on the product they are consuming. Additionally, there are several public health programs in place where cannabis is legal, which serve to further educate consumers on their purchasing decisions and cannabis use. Colorado’s “Good to Know” campaign’s targeted messages educate all Colorado residents and visitors about safe, legal, and responsible use of marijuana. Key messages educate the public about the health effects of marijuana and key laws.[6]

MYTH: A single marijuana joint has effects that linger for days and weeks

FACT:  While it is true that THC and other cannabinoids are fat-soluble and linger in the body for prolonged periods, they do not normally affect behavior beyond a few hours after consumption. Most impairment studies have found that the adverse effects of acute marijuana use wear off in 2-6 hours, commonly faster than alcohol.[7]

MYTH: More youth are consuming Cannabis in Colorado now that it is legal.

FACT: A recent report from the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment found that marijuana consumption by Colorado high school students has dipped since the state first permitted recreational Cannabis use by adults. The biannual poll also showed the percentage of high school students consuming Cannabis is smaller than the national average among teens.[8]

 

[1] Michele Ross, PhD

[2]Michele Ross, PhD

[3] Michele Ross, PhD

[4] U.S. Department of State, Office of National Drug Control Policy. National Drug Control Strategy Report —2014[INCSR] (March 2014) for 2013 data.

[5] Journal of Neuroscience January 2015, 35 (4) 1505-1512; DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1523/JNEUROSCI.2946-14.2015

[6] Am J Public Health. 2016 January; 106(1): 21–27. Published online 2016 January. doi: 10.2105/AJPH.2015.302875

[7] Alison Smiley, "Marijuana: On-Road and Driving Simulator Studies," Alcohol, Drugs, and Driving 2 #3-4: 121-34 (1986).

[8] Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, Healthy Kids Colorado Survey, 2016, https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/cdphe/news/HKCS2015

Debunking the Myths around Pueblo Ballot Measure 200

Debunking the Myths around Pueblo Ballot Measure 200

As misinformation swirls around Pueblo Ballot Measure 200, The Cannabis Business Alliance has provided accurate fact checking with sources to myths that have been circulating about Cannabis.

MYTH: Pueblo is experiencing a dramatic increase in the number of babies born THC-positive with detectable marijuana chemicals.

FACT: There have been some biased statistics shared that seem to imply that Pueblo hospitals are seeing an influx of babies born with Cannabis in their system, but the study is skewed. Because drug tests are performed only when a new mother is suspected of or admits to drug use, the percentage of positive marijuana tests has been high in Pueblo, but the absolute numbers have been low.

 

MYTH: Driving under the influence of drugs is as dangerous as alcohol and much harder for police to detect.

FACT: It is illegal to drive while under the influence of any substance, and no one should operate a vehicle while consuming Cannabis. That said, studies have failed to demonstrate that drivers with cannabinoids in the blood are significantly more likely than drug-free drivers to be responsible for road crashes 1. While being under the influence of Cannabis has been shown to mildly impair psychomotor skills, this impairment does not appear to be severe or long lasting.

 

MYTH: Commercialized marijuana in Pueblo burdens our police, schools and emergency rooms with additional costs that are not covered by marijuana taxes.

FACT: Pueblo has seen a significant economic boost since the legalization of Cannabis, accounting for 60 percent of new construction permits and $3 million a year in taxes. If Pueblo bans Cannabis sales, the jobs and taxes 2 it has brought in will go to another community. Pueblo has been an economic success story, and a symbol of what’s possible when you regulate at the state level.

 

MYTH: Regular marijuana use has proven negative health effects, especially on young people.

FACT: Regulated marijuana cannot be sold to anyone under the age of 21. If Pueblo cannabis is left in the hands of the black market, young people will be more likely to have access to it. For adults 21 and over, Cannabis has numerous health benefits that extend beyond medical marijuana, in managing stress, decreasing anxiety, slowing the progression of Alzheimer’s disease, improving the symptoms of a variety of autoimmune diseases, Parkinson’s disease, and PTSD 3.

 

MYTH: Commercialized marijuana provides convenient, colorful edible products like cupcakes and gummy bears resulting in increased emergency room visits by young children.

FACT: Colorado’s rules for infused products mandate that the products cannot be shaped like animals, or be in packaging designed to appeal to children and labeling cannot have cartoon characters or advertising that appeals to children. All Marijuana must be sold in child-resistant packaging which is opaque so the product cannot be seen within the package. Beginning Oct. 1, regulations will also require all packaging and cannabis-infused products to be marked with a specific warning symbol (“THC” and “M” with an exclamation mark within a diamond shape) so as to be identifiable outside of the required packaging.

Cannabis infused products are less likely to be accidentally ingested by kids than dish detergent packets, diaper rash cream, and even alcohol-infused chocolates. Since marijuana is non-toxic, unlike some of these other substances, any cases of accidental ingestion are non-life threatening. Commercial cannabis businesses set the standard in caring for and participating in a socially responsible industry that puts child safety above profits and promotes responsible parenting to consumers to keep edibles away from their kids. With over 5 million infused product units sold each year, there are very few and, indeed, diminishing cases of accidental ingestion. Evidence that these regulations work.

In a report released in 2016 by the state of Colorado, surveys indicated that youth marijuana use didn’t rise in the years since the 2012 vote to legalize recreational marijuana. Use among high school students went from 23 percent to about 20 percent and there was no significant change in use by kids younger than 13. 4

 

MYTH: Gang violence and drug deals are getting worse – hurting our community and our children.

FACT: Pueblo is safer with legal Cannabis, which can be regulated and which licenses business owners and employees who must have clean background checks and submit fingerprints to state and FBI to participate in the industry. Repealing licensed Cannabis businesses pushes cannabis supply back into the black market, moving organized crime and gangs into residential neighborhoods, and removes a taxable and highly regulated industry which contributes resources to law enforcement to combat black market marijuana.

MYTH: International drug cartels are using Pueblo as a headquarters for selling their drugs and distributing to other states.

FACT: Banning licensed Cannabis businesses would not keep Pueblo from buying or selling marijuana; people would revert back to purchasing Cannabis illegally from the black market, or purchase it in counties where it is still legally sold - driving taxes to places like Manitou Springs. The 76 percent of Colorado cities and counties that have opted out of the legal cannabis industry, like Colorado Springs, have more widespread black market issues. When legal means are not available, the black market rises up to supply demand.

 


1 Logan, M.C., Hunter, C.E., Lokan, R.J., White, J.M., & White, M.A. (2000). The Prevalence of Alcohol, Cannabinoids, Benzodiazepines and Stimulants Amongst Injured Drivers and Their Role in Driver Culpability: Part II: The Relationship Between Drug Prevalence and Drug Concentration, and Driver Culpability. Accident Analysis and Prevention, 32, 623-32.

2 Olinger, David. “Pueblo hospitals, doctors worried about new mothers’ marijuana use”. The Denver Post. May 1, 2016.

3 Loria, Kevin and Welsh, Jennifer. “21 medical benefits of marijuana”. Business Insider. April 20, 2015.

4 Gurman, Sadie and Wyatt, Kristen. “Colorado pot report: More adults using drug, but not kids”. Associated Press. April 18, 2016.

5 Miller, Joshua. “In Colorado, a county revolts against legalized marijuana”. The Boston Globe. September 6, 2016.

Member Spotlight: Craft

Member Spotlight: Craft

At the Cannabis Business Alliance, we value our members. Get to know them and learn about why they chose to join CBA in our new Member Spotlight features!

Why did you join CBA?
Craft joined the CBA because it was a cost effective way to keep our ear to the ground regarding new rules and regulations. It also afforded us the opportunity to have a voice in the evolution of the industry.

What are the tangible benefits of the membership?
Besides the insider knowledge you gain as a CBA member, the relationships between the members is a huge benefit. We are about to launch an edible line and so many CBA members where there for us to bounce ideas off of. They were more than willing to talk about some of their issues when they first started out, we even toured some of their facilities. It is a true membership at the CBA. Although we are in competition with one another, it certainly does not feel that way, you can put any issue out there and get great feedback.

How has your CBA membership saved you money, prevented you from making a mistake, provided you with a network etc.
Besides our wholesale lines of Panacea and Sesh, Craft does a lot of processing for dispensaries. We pride ourselves in giving the dispensary a fully compliant package, in order to due so we have to assure strict compliance to rules and regulations that normally do not apply to concentrate companies. The CBA and its membership aided us in not only knowing what packaging was needed but gave us realistic and practical issues that arise in the dispensary business. Additionally, because we were able to know and fully understand changes to the rules and regulations, which happen every year, we are able to more efficiently purchase materials from our vendors and we were able to make a smooth transition once the new rules and regulations came into effect.

Why is it important to be involved in the industry?
The cannabis industry is extremely fluid, it is constantly changing and growing. Not only around rule making months, but all months. It is such an advantage to know the rumblings on the hill and have a representative there to advocate on behalf of your company and the industry as a whole.

Customers say:
"Hi! My name's Carlos and I work for a local dispensary in Northern Colorado. Just wanted to drop a quick line and say that I love your guys' products. We carry a lot of Craft wax and Shatter and many of our customers love the quality and taste."

"Hi my name is Casey and I'm the medical floor manager at Infinite Wellness in Fort Collins. I just wanted to let you guys know that the last batch of Panacea you guys sent us was amazing. If there is anyway we can help you promote your product let me know! And keep up the good work!"

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CANNABIS BUSINESS ALLIANCE STATEMENT: DEA DENIES PETITION TO RESCHEDULE CANNABIS; CBA CALLS FOR THE PLANT TO BE DE-SCHEDULED

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact: Shawna McGregor
Shawna@rosengrouppr.com, 917-971-7852

DENVER (Aug. 11, 2016)The Cannabis Business Alliance (CBA)  has released a statement on the recent reports of the United States Drug Enforcement Administration’s denial of requests to reschedule Cannabis, currently a Schedule I drug. The advocate for Cannabis business owners is calling on the federal government to de-schedule the beneficial plant. 

“Cannabis has been objectively and scientifically determined to be safer than alcohol or tobacco, and the legal status of Cannabis needs to be taken into the same context as these other popular adult-use substances. The DEA has a vested financial interest in maintaining the prohibition of marijuana and furthering the war against it, which has locked up millions, destroyed countless lives, and squandered hundreds of millions of taxpayer dollars. States with legal marijuana understand the safe nature of this plant and its therapeutic benefit to many patients. The American people have accepted marijuana in mainstream society and the question should not be one of rescheduling this plant, but rather, how do we effectively regulate cannabis in a de-scheduled world," said Cannabis Business Alliance Executive Director Mark Slaugh.

The rescheduling of Cannabis to a Schedule II drug would have meant the DEA and federal government would have placed Cannabis under the same restrictions as pharmaceuticals, a move that would have created unnecessary red tape and a burden on states, which have already exercised their right to create their own regulatory regimes. A Schedule 1 status restricts wide-scale research into the plant’s benefits thereby restricting patients, scientists and medical practitioners. This status also leaves banking restrictions in place against licensed marijuana businesses, making them targets for neighborhood crime.

While the DEA denied the petition to reschedule Cannabis, it has opened the door for additional universities to grow cannabis for federal research. At present, the University of Mississippi is only university designated for growing federally funded cannabis. The Cannabis industry is encouraged that universities will be able to research Cannabis, but demands that Cannabis is de-scheduled completely rather than rescheduled, similar to other agriculture medicines like Echinacea and St. John’s Wort.

“The Cannabis industry needs federal recognition for a host of reasons, from banking to tax equality,” Slaugh continued. “And while we hope that the increased amount of Cannabis research on a federal level will lead to the DEA acknowledging what we already know: that Cannabis is a relatively harmless crop and should be recognized as such - by full de-schedule and through sensible regulation.”

For more information, please contact Shawna McGregor at 917-971-7852 or shawna@rosengrouppr.com.

About the Cannabis Business Alliance (CBA)The Cannabis Business Alliance (CBA) is an advocate and a resource for business owners, employees, patients and clients of the medical and adult-use marijuana industry. CBA promotes programs that will enhance the emerging marijuana industry’s place in Colorado’s business economy, create respect for the industry in the communities we serve, and support client and patient access, education and safety. For more information, visit www.cannabisalliance.org. Friend us on Facebook. Follow us on Twitter.

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Cannabis Business Alliance Statement: Withdrawal of Initiative 139

DENVER (July 8, 2016) — The Cannabis Business Alliance has released a statement on the withdrawal of proposed Initiative 139, which would have crippled Colorado’s fledging Cannabis industry and pushed supply to the black market causing a loss in jobs and tax revenue.  

“In 2012, Colorado residents showed their support of the legal Cannabis market by overwhelmingly approving Amendment 64, which requires the state to regulate the Cannabis Industry like alcohol. Proponents of Initiative 139 who were attempting to add a purity limit of 16% to the ballot in November were extremely misguided. The restrictions on Cannabis purity would have been similar to limiting the alcohol content by volume on beer, wine and liquor. It would be the equivalent of only having 3.2 beer available. The industry is thankful that common sense has prevailed,” noted Cannabis Business Alliance Executive Director Mark Slaugh.

Initiative 139, a constitutional amendment that would have forced the Colorado Legislature to set a limit of 16% or less THC in any Cannabis product sold at a state-licensed retail store, was a poorly written amendment aimed to deceive voters who just approved adult-use Cannabis sales in Colorado in 2012. This amendment would have dramatically reduced access to life altering medicine for patients including veterans suffering from PTSD and children with debilitating conditions such as epilepsy and spastic quadriplegic cerebral palsy. Bearing in mind roughly 80 percent of the state’s lawfully retailed cannabis products would be deemed illegal, Initiative 139 would have forced demand for safe and tested products back into the unregulated black market, thereby increasing the danger to public safety.

A recent report from the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment found that marijuana consumption by Colorado high school students has dropped since the state first permitted recreational Cannabis use by adults. The biannual poll also showed the percentage of high school students consuming Cannabis is less than the national average among teens. Colorado has experienced a significant economic boost since the legalization of Cannabis, accounting for sizeable job growth and tax income for Colorado.

For more information, please contact Shawna McGregor at 917-971-7852 or shawna@rosengrouppr.com.

About the Cannabis Business Alliance (CBA)

The Cannabis Business Alliance (CBA) is an advocate and a resource for business owners, employees, patients and clients of the medical and adult-use marijuana industry. CBA promotes programs that will enhance the emerging marijuana industry’s place in Colorado’s business economy, create respect for the industry in the communities we serve, and support client and patient access, education and safety. For more information, visit www.cannabisalliance.org. Friend us on Facebook. Follow us on Twitter.

 

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Cannabis Business Alliance applauds 2016 legislative session - Major initiatives reflect Colorado’s leadership for cannabusinesses

DENVER (May 12, 2016)As the 2016 legislative session comes to a closeThe Cannabis Business Alliance (CBA) applauds legislators for the hard work and the goals achieved during the 2016 session.  

The 2016 legislative session has been eventful for the Cannabis industry,” said Mark Slaugh, CBA Executive Director and iComply CEO. “Many of the bills that were up for discussion this session will have a major impact on our industry, and we are looking forward to seeing how some of these bills and laws change the landscape of the Cannabis industry in Colorado for the better. 

“Consumer and public safety are CBA’s top priorities, which is why we are working to bring best practices to the industry to ensure consumers are educated about how and when to consume Cannabis,” Slaugh noted. “CBA’s goal is to provide our members and the industry with insight to the bills being proposed, as well as sensible legislation for the industry. The industry has embraced many of the bills up for discussion this session and will work with the state to promote industry best-practices.”  

The Retail Marijuana Sunset Bill (HB1261)

The Cannabis Business Alliance (CBA) applauds the Assembly for its prudent review of the Sunset Bill.   

Purchasing Regulations

The Sunset Bill included a section that eliminated the differential between resident and non-resident purchasing limits.  Under the new amendment, non-residents would be able to purchase the same amount of product as residents, up to one ounce (or its equivalent) of marijuana.  

Inconsistent purchasing regulations didn’t make sense for the industry because having two different purchasing limits turned every transaction into an algebra equation,” Slaugh added. “The regulation was enacted because Colorado wanted to be extra diligent about diversion. However, as other states, such as Oregon and Washington, came online without differing purchasing regulations, we were able to see that tourists were not causing the diversion problem. Diversion is actually a result of the black market. 

Potency

The proposed Potency Amendment to the Marijuana Sunset Bill was left off the bill and will not be able to be brought into this session. The Potency Amendment would have required CDPHE to evaluate the current Cannabis potency limits, and further limit the potency of Cannabis and Cannabis products.  

“In 2013, Colorado residents voted for Amendment 64, which requires the state to regulate marijuana like alcohol. This attempt to introduce potency limits by prohibitionists would be the equivalent of limiting all liquor in Colorado to 3.2 percent beer. We applaud the committee members for realizing this underhanded attempt at crippling the industry and protecting the will of voters by denying this amendment to the retail code,” Slaugh remarked.  

Labeling Requirements

Cannabis Business Alliance worked with the legislature to approve an amendment to keep the most basic labeling requirements in the statute intact, but to entrust the rulemaking process to collaborate, re-examine, and determine simplified and effective labeling standards.  

CBA is committed to consumer safety and transparency. We know that existing labels contain an enormous amount of information, some of which is redundantthat can confuse consumers and achieve the opposite effect from the intention of the law,” Slaugh added. “Our hope is to be able to work with regulators and safety experts in being able to determine the right amount of information and messaging needed for Cannabis products to achieve a more effective paradigm for Cannabis package labeling.” 

Pest Management

As more states legalize the production of Cannabis, many cultivators grapple with the issue of managing pests in an industry that has no federal oversight. In order to keep patients and consumers safe, the industry must tackle best practices and testing for pest management.  Colorado would have been the first state to regulate organic labels in the Cannabis industry, but unfortunately, Colorado lawmakers rejected the Organic bill.  

“The Cannabis industry wants to comply and work with the government to provide proper regulations to businesses across the state. However, the government needs to remain objective and address certifying labs for pesticide testing as well as implement standard guidelines for the industry to follow,” Slaugh said 

Ownership Bill (SB 40)

Under current law, an owner of a medical or retail marijuana business must have been a Colorado resident for at least two years prior to applying for licensure. The Ownership Bill allows an owner to be either a two-year resident of Colorado or a United States citizen on the date of the application. It also prohibits an owner from being a publicly traded company, protecting the small business owners in the Cannabis industry. The bill requires a controlling interest of the licensees, as determined by the operating agreement, to be Colorado residents and maintain that residency while licensed 

"Now that Colorado has led the way and gained effective control and transparency of Cannabis businesses and the industry, we must remain competitive with emerging state markets like Nevada, Oregon, and even Texas, which have municipalities that will all allow outside money to be vetted and injected into their respective Cannabis industries. The State of Colorado must be able to expand on the success of our $1 billion industry as we continue to grow, consolidate and position ourselves for expansion into other markets both nationally and internationally," Slaugh noted. 

For more information, please contact Shawna McGregor at 917-971-7852 or shawna@rosengrouppr.com 

About The Cannabis Business Alliance (CBA)

The Cannabis Business Alliance (CBA) is an advocate and a resource for business owners, employees, patients and clients of the medical and adult-use marijuana industry. CBA promotes programs that will enhance the emerging marijuana industry’s place in Colorado’s business economy, create respect for the industry in the communities we serve, and support client and patient access, education and safety. For more information, visit www.cannabisalliance.org. Friend us on Facebook. Follow us on Twitter. 

 

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Is Colorado pot too potent? Plans limit THC at 16 percent

Those behind the THC-limiting proposals say they're smart, cautious moves; Opponents say they'll hurt the pot industry

Strains are tested for levels of various cannabinoids to help patients and budtenders know the strength and traits of the plant. This sample of Stevie Wonder is from Pure Medical Dispensary. (Joe Amon, Denver Post file)

Strains are tested for levels of various cannabinoids to help patients and budtenders know the strength and traits of the plant. This sample of Stevie Wonder is from Pure Medical Dispensary. (Joe Amon, Denver Post file)

By John Ingold and Ricardo Baca,

The Denver Post

A proposed ballot initiative and an amendment to a bill in the state House would cap the THC potency of recreational cannabis and marijuana products at a percentage below most of those products’ current averages.

The initiative would limit the potency of “marijuana and marijuana products” to 15 percent or 16 percent THC.

The average potency of Colorado pot products is already higher — 17.1 percent for cannabis flower and 62.1 percent for marijuana extracts, according to a state study.

Read the full article here