Peter Perrone, center, is the lab director at Gobi Analytical, the only lab in Denver that tests marijuana for pesticides. (Denver Post file)

Peter Perrone, center, is the lab director at Gobi Analytical, the only lab in Denver that tests marijuana for pesticides. (Denver Post file)

By: Ricardo Bacca and David Migoya 

Denver Post

More than a year after Denver started actively policing the marijuana industry's use of pesticides, the city's health department is changing its enforcement procedures.

Starting April 15, the Denver Department of Environmental Health will no longer test marijuana and pot products in a privately owned cannabis testing facility, the city wrote in an industry bulletin e-mailed Friday. Instead it will place marijuana products suspected of being contaminated with banned pesticides on hold, notify the state agencies that have picked up the recall process initially started by DEH and possibly order the plants or products to be destroyed, the bulletin said.

"We're taking a different approach here that's more in line with other regulated industries," said DEH executive director Bob McDonald. "It's always been an option for us to condemn product. That authority has always been there. But we've given the industry more than a year now to learn what the public health issues are. And we need to transition into more sustainable and consistent enforcement.

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